Bobcat For New Scouts

We know your son is excited and want him to be able to jump right in and participate with his new Den, even before getting to the Scout Shop to purchase his uniform and handbook.  Before he can earn his first rank, he will need to earn his Bobcat badge. Below are the (7) requirements you need to help get him started.

ON MY HONOR


Saying “On my honor” is like saying “I promise.”  It means that you will do your best to do what the Scout Oath says.


TO DO MY DUTY TO GOD AND MY COUNTRY AND TO OBEY THE SCOUT LAW

 

A duty is something you are expected to do.  At home, you might be expected to make up your bed or take out the trash.  You also have duties to God and to your country. You do your duty to God by following the teachings of your family and religious leaders.  You do your duty to your country by being a good citizen and obeying the law. You also promise to live by the 12 points of the Scout Law, which are explained below.


TO HELP OTHER PEOPLE AT ALL TIMES

 

Many people need help.  A friendly smile and a helping hand make life easier for others.  By doing good deeds, you make our world a better place.


TO KEEP MYSELF PHYSICALLY STRONG, MENTALLY AWAKE, AND MORALLY STRAIGHT

 

The last part of the Scout Oath is about taking care of yourself.  You stay physically strong when you eat the right foods and get plenty of exercise.  You stay mentally awake when you work hard in school, learn all you can, and ask questions.  You stay morally straight when you do the right thing and live your life with honesty.

The Scout Law has 12 points.  Each one is a goal for every Scout and he tries to live up to the Law every day.  It’s not always easy to do, but a Cub Scout always does his best.

A SCOUT IS…

 

TRUSTWORTHY

A Scout tells the truth and keeps his promises.  People can depend on him.

LOYAL

A Scout is true to his family, friends, Scout leaders, school, and country.

HELPFUL

A Scout volunteers to help others without expecting a reward.

FRIENDLY

A Scout is a friend to everyone, even people who are very different from him.

COURTEOUS

A Scout is polite to everyone and always uses good manners.

KIND

A Scout treats others as he wants to be treated.  He never harms or kills any living thing without good reason.

OBEDIENT

A Scout follows the rules of his family, school, and Pack.  He obeys the laws of his community and country.

CHEERFUL

A Scout looks for the bright side of life.  He cheerfully does tasks that come his way. He tries to make others happy.

THRIFTY

A Scout works to pay his way.  He uses time, property, and natural resources wisely.

BRAVE

A Scout can face danger even if he is afraid.  He stands for what is right even if others laugh at him.

CLEAN

A Scout keeps his body and mind fit.  He helps keep his home and community clean.

REVERENT

A Scout is reverent toward God.  He is faithful in his religious duties.  He respects the beliefs of others.

The Cub Scout sign is two fingers held high.  It means you are ready to listen to Akela (say Ah-KAY-la).  The Cub Scout sign is made with the right arm held high and straight up above the shoulder, with the index and middle fingers forming a V.  The other fingers are held with the thumb. The two extended fingers stand for the Scout Oath and the Scout Law. They also stand for the two alert ears of a wolf.  This is the sign of Cub Scouts all over the world.

 

The handshake is done by putting the index and middle fingers of the right hand against the other person’s wrist when shaking hands.  Cub Scouts and Cub Scout leaders use this handshake everywhere in the United States. The handshake signifies that those who use it help others and obey the Scout Oath.

 

DO YOUR BEST

The salute is made by joining the index and middle fingers of the right hand (holding the other fingers with the thumb) and touching the extended fingers to the cap visor or forehead.  The hand is held the same as for the Cub Scout sign, except the two fingers are together. The Cub Scout salute is used to salute the flag when in uniform and to show respect to Den and Pack leaders.  It can be used when greeting other Cub Scouts.

 

With your Scout, complete the exercises found in the pamphlet Youth Protection: How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse.  This can be found inside his Handbook or you can borrow a copy from your Den Leader.

To kickstart your son’s accomplishments as a new Cub Scout, he can easily earn his Cyber Chip.  While most awards he will earn are belt loops, the Cyber Chip is a patch that can be worn on his uniform pocket.  To complete this award, he must watch a video and play an online game.